Difference between revisions of "PIPA"

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'''Protect IP Act (S.968)''' also known as '''Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011''' is a proposed legislation introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy in the United States Senate Committee on Judiciary on May 12, 2011. The bill is supported by 40 Senators. Under the provisions of the bill, the Department of Justice (DOJ) receives the authority to request for a court order against suspected websites in violation of [[Intellectual Property]] Rights and selling counterfeited products. The Attorney General will then be able to issue directives to search engines, domain name registry, registrars, internet advertising companies and financial transaction providers to stop doing business with rogue websites.<ref>[http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:SN00968:@@@D&summ2=m& Bill Summary & Status S.968]</ref>
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'''Protect IP Act (S.968)''' also known as '''Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011''' is a proposed legislation introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy in the United States Senate Committee on Judiciary on May 12, 2011. The bill is supported by 40 Senators. Under the provisions of the bill, the Department of Justice (DOJ) receives the authority to request for a court order against suspected websites dedicated in infringing activities. The Attorney General will then be able to issue directives to search engines, domain name registry, registrars, internet advertising companies and financial transaction providers to stop doing business with rogue websites.<ref>[http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:SN00968:@@@D&summ2=m& Bill Summary & Status S.968]</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 19:23, 18 December 2011

Protect IP Act (S.968) also known as Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011 is a proposed legislation introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy in the United States Senate Committee on Judiciary on May 12, 2011. The bill is supported by 40 Senators. Under the provisions of the bill, the Department of Justice (DOJ) receives the authority to request for a court order against suspected websites dedicated in infringing activities. The Attorney General will then be able to issue directives to search engines, domain name registry, registrars, internet advertising companies and financial transaction providers to stop doing business with rogue websites.[1]

References