Difference between revisions of "Universal Acceptance"

From ICANNWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(added current definition of the Universal Acceptance, added bit where the issue is not limited to just browsers/domains, added the way to get involved in the effort.)
m (External Links)
 
(8 intermediate revisions by one other user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
Universal Acceptance refers to the occurrence of users experiencing browser and email or (other applications or hardware) bugs when trying to use new gTLDs. Operators of new gTLDs and more visibly all IDN TLDs (gTLDs and ccTLDs) are seeing unnaturally limited demand for names in the zones and this has presented a challenge to the goals of the new gTLD program of user choice, user confidence and name space competition. Domain names in a TLD must be useable in applications regardless of the written script, length or newness of the TLD.<ref>[https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/universal-acceptance-2012-02-25-en Universal Acceptance landing page at ICANN]</ref> The four main shifts spurring the need for Universal Acceptance:
+
'''Universal Acceptance or UA''' is the concept that all domain names should be treated equally. Under it, all valid domain names and email addresses are accepted, validated, stored, processed and displayed correctly and consistently by all Internet-enabled applications, devices and systems.<ref name="uasg">[https://community.icann.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=47255444 Universal Acceptance Steering Group (UASG)], ICANN.org. Published 2016 March 28. Retrieved 2016 April 17.</ref>
  
* Longer TLD Names: TLDs with names longer than four characters, such as MUSEUM.
+
Many systems operate under the assumption that all domain names and their e-mail addresses are only available in [[ASCII]], and that [[TLD]]s are restricted to a well-defined and constant two or three characters. The introduction of [[IDN]] [[ccTLD]]s in 2010 and the most recent wave of [[new gTLD]]s in 2013, however, greatly changed this dynamic.<ref name="uasg"></ref>
* Non-Latin based TLDs: Resulting from the addition of TLD names written in scripts other than ASCII, such as Cyrillic, Arabic and Chinese.
+
 
* Rapid addition of TLDs: The New gTLD Program is spurring very rapid additions of long ASCII names and IDN names – as of 15 August 2014, there were 1,326 applications currently proceeding through the New gTLD Program.
+
Domain names in a TLD must be useable in applications regardless of the written script, length or newness of the TLD.<ref>[https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/universal-acceptance-2012-02-25-en Universal Acceptance landing page at ICANN], ICANN.org.</ref> The four main shifts spurring the need for Universal Acceptance:
* International Email: The introduction of non-ASCII names in email. While International Domain Names (IDNs) solved part of the ability to have non-ASCII names for servers, it doesn't solve the ability to have non-ASCII names for mailboxes.<ref>[https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/universal-acceptance-faqs-2014-09-26-en Universal Acceptance Frequently Asked Questions at ICANN]</ref>
+
 
 +
* '''Longer TLD Names:''' TLDs with names longer than four characters, such as MUSEUM.
 +
* '''Non-Latin based TLDs:''' Resulting from the addition of TLD names written in scripts other than ASCII, such as Cyrillic, Arabic and Chinese.
 +
* '''Rapid addition of TLDs:''' The New gTLD Program is spurring very rapid additions of long ASCII names and IDN names – as of 15 August 2014, there were 1,326 applications currently proceeding through the New gTLD Program.
 +
* '''International Emails:''' The introduction of non-ASCII names in email. While International Domain Names (IDNs) solved part of the ability to have non-ASCII names for servers, it doesn't solve the ability to have non-ASCII names for mailboxes.<ref>[https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/universal-acceptance-faqs-2014-09-26-en Universal Acceptance Frequently Asked Questions at ICANN]</ref>
  
 
As the Internet evolved to be more personal, targeted and global, these assumptions are no longer valid. But limitations based on the old assumptions linger and now are preventing a larger and ever growing group of users from accessing the entire expanse of the Internet. In some instances, Internet users trying to use the newly delegated generic Top Level Domain (gTLDs), whose names may be many characters long and/or in non-Latin scripts, can experience "bugs" or the inability to access/register the sites.
 
As the Internet evolved to be more personal, targeted and global, these assumptions are no longer valid. But limitations based on the old assumptions linger and now are preventing a larger and ever growing group of users from accessing the entire expanse of the Internet. In some instances, Internet users trying to use the newly delegated generic Top Level Domain (gTLDs), whose names may be many characters long and/or in non-Latin scripts, can experience "bugs" or the inability to access/register the sites.
Line 10: Line 14:
 
This problem must be solved, and Universal Acceptance realized, in order to achieve a truly global, scalable Internet. It will be considered complete when any person can register and use a domain name in any top-level domain in widely distributed web browsers, email clients, in setting up accounts for Internet services and other services.   
 
This problem must be solved, and Universal Acceptance realized, in order to achieve a truly global, scalable Internet. It will be considered complete when any person can register and use a domain name in any top-level domain in widely distributed web browsers, email clients, in setting up accounts for Internet services and other services.   
  
'''Definition'''
+
==Universal Acceptance Steering Group==
 
+
[[Universal Acceptance Steering Group|Universal Acceptance Steering Group (UASG)]]  is a community-led effort. It was formed in February 2015, and is tasked with undertaking activities that will target Universal Acceptance of all ASCII domain names, ASCII email addresses, IDN domain names, and IDN email.<ref name="uasg"></ref>
Universal Acceptance (UA) is the state where all valid domain names and email addresses are accepted, validated, stored, processed and displayed correctly and consistently by all Internet-enabled applications, devices and systems. 
 
 
 
=== Get Involved ===
 
Universal Acceptance Steering Group is a community lead effort. 
 
  
 
To submit questions or contribute additional material that may be helpful in overcoming these barriers, please send an email to GlobalSupport@icann.org with "Universal Acceptance" in the subject line.  
 
To submit questions or contribute additional material that may be helpful in overcoming these barriers, please send an email to GlobalSupport@icann.org with "Universal Acceptance" in the subject line.  
Line 22: Line 22:
 
https://mm.icann.org/mailman/listinfo/ua-discuss
 
https://mm.icann.org/mailman/listinfo/ua-discuss
  
=== References ===
+
==External Links==
 +
* [https://www.icann.org/en/system/files/files/ua-quick-guide-02mar16-en.pdf Quick Guide [PDF, 153 KB]] - Helps developers understand the basic tenets of Universal Acceptance and provides practical tips on how to become UA-ready
 +
* [https://www.icann.org/en/system/files/files/ua-factsheet-a4-17dec15-en.pdf Universal Acceptance Fct Sheet [PDF, 143 KB]] - Interactive .pdf which provides answers to frequently asked questions about Universal Acceptance of top-level domains
 +
* [http://uasg.tech UASG Official Website]
 +
 
 +
==References==
 
<references/>
 
<references/>

Latest revision as of 05:10, 7 November 2016

Universal Acceptance or UA is the concept that all domain names should be treated equally. Under it, all valid domain names and email addresses are accepted, validated, stored, processed and displayed correctly and consistently by all Internet-enabled applications, devices and systems.[1]

Many systems operate under the assumption that all domain names and their e-mail addresses are only available in ASCII, and that TLDs are restricted to a well-defined and constant two or three characters. The introduction of IDN ccTLDs in 2010 and the most recent wave of new gTLDs in 2013, however, greatly changed this dynamic.[1]

Domain names in a TLD must be useable in applications regardless of the written script, length or newness of the TLD.[2] The four main shifts spurring the need for Universal Acceptance:

  • Longer TLD Names: TLDs with names longer than four characters, such as MUSEUM.
  • Non-Latin based TLDs: Resulting from the addition of TLD names written in scripts other than ASCII, such as Cyrillic, Arabic and Chinese.
  • Rapid addition of TLDs: The New gTLD Program is spurring very rapid additions of long ASCII names and IDN names – as of 15 August 2014, there were 1,326 applications currently proceeding through the New gTLD Program.
  • International Emails: The introduction of non-ASCII names in email. While International Domain Names (IDNs) solved part of the ability to have non-ASCII names for servers, it doesn't solve the ability to have non-ASCII names for mailboxes.[3]

As the Internet evolved to be more personal, targeted and global, these assumptions are no longer valid. But limitations based on the old assumptions linger and now are preventing a larger and ever growing group of users from accessing the entire expanse of the Internet. In some instances, Internet users trying to use the newly delegated generic Top Level Domain (gTLDs), whose names may be many characters long and/or in non-Latin scripts, can experience "bugs" or the inability to access/register the sites.

This problem must be solved, and Universal Acceptance realized, in order to achieve a truly global, scalable Internet. It will be considered complete when any person can register and use a domain name in any top-level domain in widely distributed web browsers, email clients, in setting up accounts for Internet services and other services.

Universal Acceptance Steering Group

Universal Acceptance Steering Group (UASG)  is a community-led effort. It was formed in February 2015, and is tasked with undertaking activities that will target Universal Acceptance of all ASCII domain names, ASCII email addresses, IDN domain names, and IDN email.[1]

To submit questions or contribute additional material that may be helpful in overcoming these barriers, please send an email to GlobalSupport@icann.org with "Universal Acceptance" in the subject line.

Join the UASG Discussion List https://mm.icann.org/mailman/listinfo/ua-discuss

External Links

References