Tripti Sinha

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Tripti SinhaPortrait.jpg
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Organization: University of Maryland
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Region: North America
Country: USA

Tripti Sinha is a member of the ICANN Board and the Assistant Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Maryland (UMD) in the Division of Information Technology. Sinha has over three decades of progressive experience in Internet and cyber-infrastructure technologies. She has held leadership positions in engineering, operations, finance, governance, advocacy, and policy.

Career History

She leads Advanced Cyber Infrastructure and Internet Global Services (ACIGS) and is the Chief Executive of the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX), which operates a high-performance regional research and education 100G network for advanced cyber-infrastructure services. She is also responsible for high-performance computing services and strategies.[1]

ICANN and Internet Governance Participation

Sinha was selected by the NomCom to serve on the ICANN Board, and her term runs from October 2018 to the AGM 2021. She served as Co-Chair of ICANN's Root Server System Advisory Committee (RSSAC) from 2015 to 2018.

Current Committees

Internet Initiatives in the U.S.

Sinha is very involved in the Internet2 community on activities related to the US national Internet backbone. She is also Chair of the Board of Directors of The Quilt, whose mission is to provide advocacy for research and education networking.

Education

Sinha has an undergraduate degree in Computer Science from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, and did graduate work in Computer Science at the University of Maryland.

Personal Life

She was born in India and lives in the U.S. As a child and young adult, she moved back-and-forth between the U.S. and India, which gave her an appreciation for global pluralism. She is proficient in English and Hindi and has an understanding of Punjabi, Urdu, and the ancient Sanskrit language.

References