Difference between revisions of "Community TLD"

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Revision as of 21:39, 11 October 2012

This article is neutral, and sponsored by Neustar,
the technical provider for 358 new gTLD applicants
& a leading telecom information provider,
learn more about their services here
Neustarlogo.png
ICANNWiki Gold Sponsor

A Community TLD is a regulated type of generic top level domain name (gTLD) made possible through ICANN's New gTLD Program; it is intended for cohesive, community groups that are interested in operating their own TLD registry. Community TLDs must represent and receive strong, written support from a clearly defined group of people such as cultural, religious, social groups or industry sectors. The existence of the group must be unquestionable.[1] [2] An example of a community TLD used by ICANN, is the .SUGAR TLD. This example was used by ICANN staff to brief them on a proposed registry change request. [3]

Community groups are given precedence for TLDs in contention; that is, if there are multiple applicants for a given string, and one of the applicants applies and proves community status, the community group is automatically given precedence to the TLD. Community status is proven through a process known as Community Priority Evaluation.

Requirements for Community TLD Applicants

Based on the gTLD Applicant Guidebook's process for Community Priority Evaluation applicants for community based gTLDs must demonstrate the following, scoring at least 14 of 16 possible points:[4]

  • Community Establishment (4 points)
    • Delineation: Demonstrate an ongoing relationship with a clearly delineated community (up to 2 points)
      • 2 points if there is a clearly delineated, organized, and pre-existing community
      • 1 point if there is a clearly delineated and pre-existing community, but not fulfilling the requirements for a score of 2.
    • Extension (up to 2 points)
      • 2 points if community of considerable size and longevity (2 points)
      • 1 point if Community of either considerable size or longevity, but not fulfilling the requirements for a score of 2
  • Nexus between proposed string and community. Does the applied for a gTLD string strongly and specifically relate to the community named in the application? (4 points)
    • Nexus (up to 3 points)
      • 3 points if the String matches the name of the community or is a well-known short form or abbreviation of the community
      • 2 points if the string identifies the community, but does not qualify for a score of 3
    • Uniqueness (1 point)
      • 1 point if the string has no other significant meaning beyond identifying the community described in the application
  • Registration Policies (4 points)
    • 1 point Eligibility; restricted to community members
    • 1 point Name Selection; policies include name restriction rules corresponding the the community's mission and purpose
    • 1 point Content and USe; policies include content and use rules corresponding to the community's mission and purpose
    • 1 point Enforcement; policies include specific enforcement measures
  • Community Endorsement (4 points)
    • Support
      • 2 points if the applicant has multiple strong letters of support from recognized community institutions
      • 1 point if the applicant has one documented community entity supporting its application
    • Opposition
      • 2 points if there is no opposition of relevance
      • 1 point if there is opposition from only one relevant group of non-negligible size

Applied for Community TLDs

The following TLD applications have all been filed as community applications, note that some applicants have filed two applications for the same string, one as community and one as generic.[5] This is done defensively so that in the case that community status is denied the applicant still has a chance at obtaining the TLD. Community applications represent 4% of the total applied for strings.[6]

  1. .halal
  2. .islam
  3. .shia
  4. .pars
  5. .thai
  6. .spa
  7. .bbb
  8. .广东
  9. .pyc
  10. .kids
  11. .cpa
  12. .madrid
  13. .scot
  14. .mma
  15. .tennis
  16. .gay
  17. .tirol
  18. .merck (2 community applicants)
  19. .art
  20. .tatar
  21. .quebec
  22. .gea
  23. .swiss
  24. .med - (2 community applicants)
  25. .католик
  26. كاثوليك.
  27. .天主教
  28. .catholic
  29. .edeka
  30. .eus
  31. .gal
  32. .gmbh
  33. .ismaili
  34. .lamborghini
  35. .leclerc
  36. .hamburg
  37. .music
  38. .lds
  39. .art
  40. .stada
  41. .paris
  42. .radio
  43. .audi
  44. .ovh
  45. .gree
  46. .pharmacy
  47. .bank
  48. .insurance
  49. .webs
  50. .hotel
  51. .adac
  52. .wien
  53. .aco
  54. .taxi
  55. .sport
  56. .bugatti
  57. .ikano
  58. .immo
  59. .ski
  60. .archi
  61. .bzh
  62. .ieee
  63. .corsica
  64. .政务
  65. .eco
  66. ngo
  67. .ong
  68. .berlin
  69. .osaka
  70. .versicherung
  71. .shop
  72. .llc
  73. .inc
  74. .corp
  75. .llp

Potential Benefits of Operating a Community TLD

Some proposed benefits of a community TLD include:[7]

  • It will help strengthen the cultural and social identity of the group and provide an avenue for growth and increased support among its members.
  • It enables the community to control their domain name space by creating their own rules and policies for registration to be able to protect and implement their community's standards and values
  • It will boost the trust and confidence of its members
  • The community may be recognized globally
  • Members will be able to register a relevant, shorter and easy to remember domain name
  • It will generate income from registration and annual renewal fees of domain names

References